CELEBRATE SIX YEARS OF GHOST TOWN POETRY OPEN MIC AT COVER TO COVER BOOKS with Miles of Pies author Eileen Elliott and songwriter Matt Meighan

Cover to cover flyer January 2013

Printed Matter Vancouver would like to thank the following businesses and individuals for making 2012 another great year for poetry in the ‘Couve: The Catalyst, Everybody’s Music, Leah Jackson (Angst Gallery and Niche Wine and Art Bar), Mint Tea, Moe’s, One World Merchants, Pop Culture, and Urban Eccentric.

We would also like to thank the featured readers and musicians who shared their work with our community in 2012: Jennifer Pratt-Walter, Bret Jorgensen, Lincoln’s Beard, John Sibley Williams, John Burgess, Raul Sanchez, Jenney Pauer, David Matthews, Leah Stenson, Patrick Bocarde, Melissa Sillitoe, A. Molotkov, Ragon Linde, Julene Tripp Weaver, Kristin Roedell, Traci Schatz, Ric Vrana, Jane Ormerod of great weather for MEDIA, Gina Williams, Dan Raphael, Richard Loranger, and Mary Slocum.

In addition, we owe a debt of gratitude to the many poets who have moved and entertained us at the open mic—without your continued participation and support, we would have nothing to celebrate.

Finally, our thanks to Mel Sanders for staying open late once a month and for her undying commitment to local writers.

Bios:

Eileen Elliott head shot 2012

Eileen Davis Elliott works as a poet and visual artist after retiring from a career in mental health and education. She has consistently focused on themes of struggle and redemption of the human spirit in whatever state it finds itself; trying to find personal meaning or while interacting with other souls. She has two books of poetry: Prodigal Cowgirl and the newly released Miles of Pies. Her most current writings have focused on how autism affects families. She is also doing a series of prose poems about life in Mexico, for a chapbook with the draft title Pobrecitos. Her art quilts tell stories about the people who receive them and she hopes they give warmth and comfort. She also likes to feed people and have long, lingering conversations while the dirty dishes wait for later.

Matt Meighan bw with guitar

“Though the way ahead never did get clear, I guess we made it after all” sings Portland songwriter Matt Meighan, and the experience of miles traveled is easy to hear in his music. Drawing on his years as an activist, journalist, parent and poet, Matt writes tradition-steeped, thought-provoking songs that are at turns personal, political, poignant and funny, infused with a philosophical bent and an audible love of language.

A song collector as well as writer, Matt mixes his originals with songs by fellow songwriters as well as older songs from the folk and blues traditions. His commitments to good writing and “truth-telling” are clear in the songs he chooses and the songs he writes, many of which are performed by other songwriters. He is currently recording his second CD, Long Way ‘Round.

Matt’s engaging, relaxed performance style and fingerstyle acoustic guitar make him an ideal performer for house concerts and similar listening venues. He also performs as a duo, with Sherry Pendarvis on upright bass, and adds a fiddle or mandolin player to perform as a trio.

After earning an MFA in poetry at the Jack Keruoac school of Disembodied Poetics (Naropa University) in Boulder, Colorado, Matt turned his hand to songwriting and became a signifcant part of the Boulder acoustic music scene, organizing monthly songwriter gatherings and hosting numerous songwriter showcases. In 2003 moved to Portland, where he performs regularly, teaches a popular “Songwriting as Truth Telling” class, and hosts the weekly Songwriter Roundup show at Artichoke Music.

Matt began playing songs while still in high school in Chicago in the 1960s. His musical education began at the Old Town School of Folk Music and haunting the blues and jazz clubs of 1960s Chicago. He has since traveled the world with his music, performing in venues and on street corners across the U.S., Australia and Italy, and has regularly brought his songs to the pubs of Ireland over the last 20 years. He and his wife Nancy met at the Kerrville Folk Festival in Kerrville Texas, which they attend every year. Since moving to Portland Matt has become both a popular performer and an ardent supporter of the Portland-area acoustic music community.

GHOST TOWN POETRY OPEN MIC featuring Portland writers Patrick Bocarde and Melissa Sillitoe Thursday, July 12, 2012 at Cover to Cover Books

GHOST TOWN POETRY OPEN MIC
Featuring Patrick Bocarde and Melissa Sillitoe

hosted by Christopher Luna and Toni Partington
all ages and uncensored since 2004

7pm Thursday, July 12, 2012
and every second Thursday
Cover to Cover Books
6300 NE St. James Rd., Suite 104B
(St. James & Minnehaha)
Vancouver, WA
360-993-7777
christopherjluna@gmail.com

http://www.printedmattervancouver.com

http://www.covertocoverbooks.net

Featuring Patrick Bocarde and Melissa Sillitoe:

Patrick Bocarde did, according to legend, come from his mother’s womb in the dreaded Nordic winter of 1969. He saved his family just after birth when instinctively he knew they must live off the warmth of burning Rod McKuen Albums. Patrick graduated from SUNY-Binghamton in 1991, and a year later headed west with a car full junk and a head full of poems which soon he would be unleashing on an unsuspecting audience, Among them the early Cafe Lena crowd.

Since then, Patrick has been a contributor to the culture of Portland poetry, having been a host, a sound engineer (to this day!) for KBOO’s poetry program Talking Earth, and contributor to local writing journals including the Broken Word anthologies, the Temple, and Venetian Blind Drunk, among others. He was, with co-conspirator Neil Anderson, creator of the satirical short film “the worriers” (based on the cult classic the warriors) and his chapbooks include This Economy Must Be Destroyed, Walking Home Weird, and Metalbook (available for $5 at the July 12 event).

 

Nailpyres by Patrick Bocarde

We regret the loss of blood

as a thousand nail fangs pierce

her humphung human flesh;

The Society for the Conservation

of Humans claims we must limit

the spread of Nailpyres, who

needlessly lose blood and waste

human stock by the dozens each night.

They must be forced to wear

safe, workable fangs or we

shall exterminate them with extreme

prejudice. So, frail human

victims of supple neck and breast,

choose your vampires carefully,

and you will be rewarded

with a slow yet pleasurable demise.

Melissa Sillitoe: I moved from Salt Lake City to Portland in 2005, and I love this silver sky and river city and its soft light. As a poet, I use everyday words and their inherent music, juxtaposing these with lyrical and symbolic language. I hope to write poems where every word matters, even if its purpose is to keep the poem’s music or momentum intact. I’ve published in a few places like THE BEAR DELUXE, and I’ve performed at invited readings series, including ones produced by dan raphael and KBOO’s Barbara LaMorticella. In 2007, I created Show and Tell Gallery, a 501c3 non-profit that continues to produce weekly spoken word events, some spontaneous, some rehearsed collaborations. I also co-produce the Verse in Person series at Northwest Library and have helped produce other events, such as Goatfest and a bluegrass music series at Backspace Café.

What Happened by Melissa Sillitoe

It was autumn, my first.

It was Red Butte Garden.

Who cares how I got there,

my sleepwalk, those unlikely

years spent outside seasons,

eyes adjusting to starless nights.

I might have looked down,

as usual, and missed it.

No trick of light

that glowing ember sky,

when one sunbeam

struck.  It stuck.

Now, miles later, I don’t

know why I looked up.

Gold fell from openhanded trees.

One birdnote I couldn’t sing

startled my dreams.

I know just this:

all I had was gone, all I

did not dare hope waited.

No. More. Trees,

Where, everywhere,

vermilion autumn

bled for me, in spite of me.

Note: This poem was recently published in Take Out 8, published and edited by Laura Winter.